Eating Downtown.

Everyday Living

“Women shoppers or employed girls frequently have occasion to dine in restaurants downtown. Some people are forced to eat all noontime meals away from home except on Sundays. This is unfortunate if the person does not know how to select an attractive place to eat, as well as a satisfactory and inexpensive meal. Many things must be considered in making a wise selection. Convenience, time, cleanliness, service, quality and variety of food, quiet, and cost are all important factors.

“A girl with a minimum wage should never select a tearoom where a tea-leaf reader tells fortunes. In the first place, the food may be expensive and inferior. One must pay for ‘fortunes’ that are silly nonsense and sacrifice food values essential for health.”

Everyday Living for Girls: A Textbook in Personal Regimen, L. Van Duzer (formerly Supervisor of Home Economics, Cleveland Public Schools) et al., published 1936.

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5 Responses to Eating Downtown.

  1. I want that book! My mom has an ancient book of home economics and remedies and such from the 1800s. I loved reading it when I was a kid. Full of such odd wisdom.

  2. Philippa says:

    You would like *How To Run Your Home Without Help*, I think

  3. Madeline says:

    I have to update my links list 🙂 I am glad to have found you again. That is most definitely a gem of a book. I am geeking out reading your fashion posts. I love a kindred soul.

  4. Amanda says:

    What a great book! I love old books. Back when I was doing my thesis I was on the hunt for different additons of Tom Jones by Henry Fielding and I found this one from the 50s that said something in the introduction like… “This scandalous book is purely for entertainment and will never be taken seriously by any literary critic.” Funny there is a whole community of literary critics whose main focus is Tom Jones.

    By the way I love your new location!

    Amanda
    (Amanda’s Weekly Zen)

  5. Meg says:

    I love those old books. I inherited my grandmother’s copy of Amy Vanderbilt’s Etiquette. It reads very much like that.

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